27 September 2016

SteelMint prepares for raw materials conference:

Bangladesh event will focus on raw material issues in the Indian subcontinent’s steel industry.

The India-based Steel Mint Group is preparing for its second Coal, Steel and Raw Material Conference: Emerging Bangladesh, which will take place 14-15 November 2016 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, at the Hotel Radisson Blue.

Namrata Diwaker, group brand manager with the SteelMint Group, says the first edition of the Coal, Steel and Raw Material Conference: Emerging Bangladesh drew some 170 participants from more than 110 different companies.

Topics scheduled to be discussed at the November 2016 event include the growing ship recycling sector in Bangladesh.

“Bangladesh is among the top nations where ship dismantling happens over a large scale,” says Diwaker.

“The nation dismantled around 270 ships in 2012, 210 ships in 2013, 223 ships in 2014 and around 200 ships in 2015,” she adds.

Diwaker says that activity yielded some 7.86 million tonnes of ferrous scrap in 2014 and about 4.73 million tonnes in 2015.

According to SteelMint, “Bangladesh continues to be one of Asia’s most emerging markets in the steel, cement and power sectors, with a growing need for technologies and raw materials such as coal, billet, scrap, hot briquetted iron, pig iron and hot-rolled coil steel.”

Adds the firm, “The two-day international ConfEx (conference cum exhibition) will be attended by major raw material and technology suppliers from all over the world with an objective to network with steel, cement and power producers and traders in Bangladesh.”

More information on registering for the November event in Bangladesh can be found here.

Source: recyclingtoday global. 27 November 2016

25 September 2016

Legambiente joins Platform's campaign for sustainable ship recycling

Brussels, 19 September 2016 - The NGO Shipbreaking Platform welcomes onboard Legambiente, its first-ever Italian member organization.

banner-legambiente3 
Legambiente is a non-profit association created in 1980 for the safeguard of the environment and for the promotion of sustainable lifestyles, production systems and use of resources. It is the most widespread environmental organization in Italy with over 115.000 members and over 2 million people involved in volunteer activities and campaigns. Legambiente's strength is based on the work of 1.500 local groups and coordinated through 20 regional committees and a national headquarter in Rome.

“We strongly believe that our commitment to protect the marine environment perfectly fits with the aim of the NGO Shipbreaking Platform with whom we share the same objectives”, said Sebastiano Venneri, Marine Conservation Officer of Legambiente. “Ship owners have a particular responsibility to make sure that their ships are dismantled in a sustainable way. Nevertheless, Italian-owned commercial vessels keep being broken on South Asian beaches, polluting the environment and putting at risk workers’ safety. It is our goal to stop the shameful practice of beaching and to advocate for truly safe and environmentally sound ship recycling, involving citizens and the industry sector in Italy”.

The demolition of ships is a hazardous endeavor that requires adequate measures to protect the maritime environment, to ensure environmentally safe and sound management of hazardous waste, and to guarantee high health and safety standards for workers. Yet only a fraction of decommissioned ships is handled in a safe and sustainable manner. More than 70% of the end-of-life ships sold for dismantling today end up in South Asia, the region that has served as the main destination for obsolete tonnage in the last decades. The end-of-life vessels are run up on the tidal shores of India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, where they are dismantled mainly manually by a migrant work force. The beaching method is at the source of coastal pollution and dangerous working conditions, while modern ship recycling facilities remain unused for the sole purpose of maximizing profits for the shipping industry. In the last seven years, around 90 Italian-owned ships have been dismantled on South Asian beaches. The export of end-of-life vessels from Europe to developing countries is illegal under European environmental law.

“The Platform is excited to join hands with Legambiente and to raise concerns related to unsustainable shipbreaking practices in Italy together. Dirty and dangerous shipbreaking has not yet received the necessary attention in Italy, and Italian ship owners are yet to pledge and implement clean and safe ship recycling policies", said Patrizia Heidegger, Executive Director of the NGO Shipbreaking Platform.

Source: NGO shipbreaking platform. 19 September 2016

24 September 2016

Nitin Gadkari wants Alang shipyard type model for recycling automobiles:

Can the Alang shipyard model of dismantling ships from around the world, and becoming a global centre for ship-breaking and ship-recycling, be replicated for recycling automobiles.

A vehicle-scrapping plan is being proposed by the government for 15-year-old heavy and medium commercial vehicles, as it would not only boost growth of the Indian automotive industry with renewed demand, but would also help the generation of raw materials for the industry, Gadkari said.  (PTI)
A vehicle-scrapping plan is being proposed by the government for 15-year-old heavy and medium commercial vehicles, as it would not only boost growth of the Indian automotive industry with renewed demand, but would also help the generation of raw materials for the industry, Gadkari said. (PTI)
Can the Alang shipyard model of dismantling ships from around the world, and becoming a global centre for ship-breaking and ship-recycling, be replicated for recycling automobiles? Nitin Gadkari, Union minister, MoRTH (ministry of road transport and highways) and shipping, urged industry to set up vehicle recycling businesses along the coast of the country, with port connectivity, to create an ecosystem for dismantling old vehicles and recovering precious metals. These players could not only recycle automobiles from India but also accept vehicles for recycling from across the world, he suggested.

A vehicle-scrapping plan is being proposed by the government for 15-year-old heavy and medium commercial vehicles, as it would not only boost growth of the Indian automotive industry with renewed demand, but would also help the generation of raw materials for the industry, Gadkari said. Recycling of aluminium, copper, steel and plastic will enable automotive companies to get raw materials at a cheaper price and improve their competitiveness in the market, he said. Industry is currently importing these raw materials at a higher price. These imports could be reduced and foreign exchange conserved, he pointed out. The minister was speaking at the AGM of the Mahratta Chamber of Commerce, Industries & Agriculture in Pune on Friday.

Gadkari said those scrapping old vehicles will get tax exemption from both the central and the state governments.

Source: financial express. 24 September 2016

GMS: One Step Closer to Ratification of the Hong Kong Convention

Denmark’s recent decision to move ahead with the ratification of the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships (HKC) in Spring 2017, brings the legislation one step closer to implementation. On the announcement of this encouraging news Dr Anil Sharma, President and CEO of GMS, the world’s largest buyer of ships for recycling, commented:

“Denmark’s steps towards the ratification of the HKC is a clear endorsement of the growing international support for the principle that the industry should work to improve the safety and environmental standards at ship recycling yards, wherever in the world they may be. The standards laid out in the HKC and its guidelines are enabling the industry to achieve sustainable goals for ship recycling. Importantly, the market is beginning to hold companies accountable for out-dated procedures. There is increasing momentum towards voluntary Statements of Compliance in line with the HKC and more owners are now opting for green ship recycling when vessels are sold.”

“Denmark’s support of the HKC is of significant importance. It will have an enormous impact globally on the sustainability of ship recycling and, consequently, on the lives and conditions of shipyard workers. GMS has always supported safe and environmentally sound ship recycling becoming the norm, rather than the exception and the entry into force of the HKC will ensure this happens.

“As the HKC progresses towards enforcement, the European Union’s Ship Recycling Regulation is also entering a critical stage, as a decision is awaited for the yards in Alang holding Statements of Compliance with the HKC whether they should be included on the list of EU approved recycling yards.

“These yards have proven that they meet the high safety and environmental standards laid out in the HKC through significant investment, training and development within the region. Excluding these yards would create an insurmountable divide within the industry based solely on their geographic location, and threaten to halt the positive progress made by the HKC in South Asia.

“Denmark’s decision to move towards the ratification the HKC shows a growing international support for sustainable recycling across the globe. We hope that other countries will follow Denmark’s example through ratification and vocal support for its high standards and principles.”

Source: Hellenic shipping news. 20 September 2016

Panama accedes to ship recycling convention

The International Maritime Organization’s effort to implement new international regulations intended to the promote safe and environmentally sound ship recycling received a major boost this week with ratification by the world’s largest largest flag state.

On Monday Panama became the fifth IMO Member State to accede to the IMO’s Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmental Sound Recycling of Ships (Hong Kong Convention), which is aimed at ensuring that ships sent for scrap do not pose a risk to human health and safety or to the environment.

The Hong Kong Convention addresses issues related to ship recycling by creating a set of standards covering the handling of hazardous materials, the design and construction of ships, recycling facilities, and the preparation of ships sent for scrap. Adopted in 2009, the Convention won’t enter into force until ratification by 15 States representing no less than 40% of the world fleet’s tonnage.

With it’s open system, Panama manages the world’s largest ship registry, registering over 8,000 vessels representing a combined 218 million GT, or approximately 18% of the world merchant fleet.

Prior to Panama, the Hong Kong Convention had only been ratified by Norway, Congo, France and Belgium, making for a little over 2% of the world’s tonnage, according to the IMO.

Last week Denmark also pledged to ratify the convention in Spring 2017.

Shipbreaking Yards

The Hong Kong Convention is also pushing scrap yards to upgrade facilities to comply with its standards. There are even a number of yards now in Alang, India, a shipbreaking hub notoriously known for its poor conditions and polluting practices, that have received Statements of Compliance with the Hong Kong Convention. The improving conditions have even prompted the world’s largest shipping company, Maersk Line, to return to Alang where the company says it can save it can save $1 to $2 million in recycling costs per ship and help quality yards improve even further.

According to the NGO Shipbreaking Platform, a critic of Alang and unsafe ship breaking practices, 60% of 768 ships sold for scrap in 2015 were broken up along the shores of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, where the controversial practice of beaching is still used.

By the end of 2016, the European Union is expected to decide whether or not to include Southeast Asian yards on a list of approved facilities that comply with sustainable recycling practices for EU-flagged ships. The EU law currently is expected to favor facilities in places like Turkey and China.

The NGO Shipbreaking Platform has been critical of ship owners, including Danish-based Maersk Line, for using ‘flags of convenience’, i.e. Panama, in order to bypass EU law.

“As the HKC progresses towards enforcement, the European Union’s Ship Recycling Regulation is also entering a critical stage, as a decision is awaited for the yards in Alang holding Statements of Compliance with the HKC whether they should be included on the list of EU approved recycling yards,” commented Dr Anil Sharma, President and CEO of GMS, the world’s largest buyer of ships for recycling and proponent of safe ship recycling in Alang.

“These yards have proven that they meet the high safety and environmental standards laid out in the HKC through significant investment, training and development within the region. Excluding these yards would create an insurmountable divide within the industry based solely on their geographic location, and threaten to halt the positive progress made by the HKC in South Asia,” Dr. Sharma added.

Source: gcaptain. 20 September 2016