10 April 2017

Design for recycling: a route to green ship recycling

Ship recycling at the end of a ship’s useful life aims to make the shipping industry more environmentally sustainable and is a major source of employment in developing countries. However, there are associated health, safety and environmental concerns. This study argues these concerns are due to inappropriate design and explains how ‘design for recycling’ can reduce the costs and risks of ship recycling.

The final stage of a ship’s life cycle — recycling — is essential for renewal of the shipping fleet. On average, 96% of the ship can be recycled or reused. The re-use of increasingly scarce materials also reduces the burden that shipping places on natural resources, improving the environmental sustainability of the industry.

Ship recycling also supports the developing economies of several countries, such as Bangladesh, China, India, Pakistan and Turkey, which together represent 97% of the world’s ship recycling capacity. However, current recycling practices can have negative social and environmental impacts. Ships contain toxic materials, such as asbestos and heavy metals, which many ship recycling hubs do not have the infrastructure to treat, generating health and safety concerns for workers and contaminating the natural environment.

Awareness of the risks of ship recycling was first raised in the early 1990s, leading the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to adopt the Hong Kong Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships in 2009. More recently, the EU has published a Ship Recycling Regulation, which aims to reduce the negative impacts caused by recycling EU Member State-flagged ships.

The researchers of this paper argue that, to address the negative impacts of ship recycling properly, hazards must be considered during the design process. ‘Design for recycling’, a concept which involves identifying the recycling challenges during the design stage, has already been successfully applied in the automobile industry. In the context of ships, it could involve identifying hazards, such as toxic paints, or inefficiencies, such as oil tanks that must be manually cleaned before they can be recycled.

Their basic principle is for ship designers to ensure that recycling is as safe, efficient and environmentally friendly as possible. Not only would this prevent or reduce the use of materials, such as asbestos, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), heavy metals and oils (e.g. residual fuels), that could be a threat to workers and the local environment during dismantling, it would also reduce risk throughout the ship’s life-cycle, decreasing risks to builders and crew members.

The concept has three key objectives:
- providing an accurate inventory of hazardous materials,
- reducing or replacing hazardous materials, and
- making the ship easy to dismantle.

The latter could be achieved by using techniques such as standardisation of all parts and equipment on every ship to make it easier to identify the components of end of life ships for potential re-use, remanufacturing or recycling. Other techniques for ease of dismantling would be to include properly designed lifting supports for handling dismantled structural parts to minimise accidents due to falling components. The key objectives could be incorporated into design rules through IMO codes, for example.

However, there are concerns about the impact that implementing these changes would have on the costs of building and operating ships. To deal with these additional costs, the researchers suggest that the expense of creating inventories of hazardous materials should be borne by the ship owner (as in the ‘polluter pays’ principle). They also say costs should be calculated for different replacement materials and design changes in order to identify the most affordable options. The authors say the negative impacts of ship recycling presently undermine the industry’s contribution to sustainable development. With this paper, they describe a method, with techniques for efficient ship dismantling, to reduce these negative impacts by improving ship design and, ultimately, to achieve cost-effective green ship recycling.

Source: European Commission. Thematic Issue 55. June 2016. Ship Recycling: Reducing Human and Environmental Impacts

March has been a very busy month for the GMS Green Team!

A weekly training programme for a selection of ship recycling yard workers in Alang has been initiated under our CSR & RSPR programs. Navyug Ship Breaking yard (Plot no.153M) in Alang was the first yard where the workers’ training programme took place under the care and guidance of Dr. Anand Hiremath, our Green recycling Lead Co-ordinator in Bhavnagar who is leading our responsible ship recycling activation and oversees the implementation of our RSPR program.

 

The yard workers were trained on safe-for-entry procedures and work in confined spaces while engaging in onboard cutting processes using an oxy-LPG torch. Other subjects that were covered in detail, included: the use of a selfcontained breathing apparatus (SCBA), understanding confined spaces using a General Arrangement (GA) plan, emergency evacuation and rescue plan while working in a confined space, the use of a multi gas detector and the role of helpers during the cutting process on-board. We are also quite proud to announce that Dr. Hiremath has just been awarded the “Approved HazMat Expert” certificate from DNV-GL in Piraeus, adding more value to the extensive portfolio of services we provide to our esteemed Clientele globally.


Dr. Hiremath will be preparing and overseeing the implementation of IHM (Inventory of Hazardous Materials) an important step before the actual recycling process of a vessel begins. GMS is the first and only cash buyer of ships and offshore assets able to provide this special service. Last, we have just produced a really useful manual: The GMS Green Handbook: A Practical Guide to Monitor Safe and Environmentally Friendly Ship Recycling.


This guide covers ISO 9000, 14000, 18000 & 30000, HKC, EUSRR, Social Accountability aspects, ILO, Basel Technical Guidance on full and partial recycling of ships, Ship Breaking Code 2013 and many more. The purpose of this guide is to undertake a comprehensive, targeted evaluation for delivering responsible ship recycling practices at yards under the supervision and guidance of our GMS Green Team in a step-by-step approach while covering aspects of health, safety and working conditions in an effort to prove that “zero accidents at yards and near-zero pollution to the surrounding environment” is achievable.

Source: hellenic shipping news. 10 April 2017

09 April 2017

Ship Arrested in Norway Following Disastrous Flight to Asian Recycling Yard:


Norway has arrested a ship which had to be rescued as it fled to a notorious South Asian recycling yard following a tip off that it had been sold illegally.

The Norwegian environmental authorities have arrested a ship following a tip off that it had been sold illegally and was destined for breaking in a dirty and dangerous South Asian recycling facility.

NGO Shipbreaking Platform and its member organisation Bellona explained that the vessel, is not allowed to leave Norway unless it is to sail to a ship recycling destination in line with international and European hazardous waste laws. According to the Norwegian Environment Agency, it is the first arrest of a vessel in Norway for the illegal export of hazardous waste..

The Platform explained that it had been informed already during the summer of 2015 that the ship was sold for scrap.

Having been laid up for many years on the Norwegian west coast the Platform said that it immediately contacted the Norwegian owners, Eide Group, to make them aware of the laws governing end-of-life ships and that exporting the vessel to a South Asian beaching yard would be in breach of the European Waste Shipment Regulation and the UN Basel Convention. Eide Group was said to have denied then that the vessel would be scrapped.

According to Shipbreaking Platform on 22 February 2017 the vessel attempted to leave Norway under a new name, flag and registered owner.

Now called TIDE CARRIER, the ship was said to have swapped its flag to that of Comoros and was registered under an anonymous St. Kitts and Nevis based post-box company, Julia Shipping. The organisation said that these are all solid indications that a cash buyer, a scrap dealer specialised in the trading of end-of-life ships to the South Asian beaching yards, was involved.

Drama on the High Seas
The TIDE CARRIER however ran into difficulties as the engine stopped working outside the Norwegian coast of Jaeren. The coastguards were forced to trigger a salvage operation, complicated by way of the weather conditions, to avoid the risk of oil spill and grounding close to one of the most renowned beaches in Norway.

The rescue operation included the emergency evacuation of five crew members – one of which suffered from a broken shoulder – and the deployment of two tugboats to bring the ship to safety.

Norwegian authorities have since then been trying to trace the owner and insurer of the vessel, given that someone should be held accountable for the costs of the rescue operation incurred by the Norwegian state.

While the authorities investigated the ownership and condition of the vessel, it remained docked in Gismarvik, Norway.

“We immediately informed Norwegian authorities that the ship was most likely sold for scrapping in South Asia and also that there were suspicions that the ship had been used to store hazardous sludge,” said Ingvild Jenssen, director at the NGO Shipbreaking Platform.

The Platform added that on Monday 4 April the Environment Agency and the Police found evidence that the vessel was under a “break up voyage” insurance from Norway to Gadani, Pakistan. They were also said to have found unidentified and excessive amounts of sludge and fuel oils.

What’s in a Name?
According to the NGO the previous week, while the vessel was still in the dock, the TIDE CARRIER changed name to HARRIER and changed from Comoros to another popular end-of-life flag - Palau.

Consequently, it was said to have became clear that the repair contract from Oman which had been provided to the Norwegian authorities as a way to escape checks for the illegal export of the vessel was false. Revelations of the attempt of the ship’s illegal export and subsequent breaking on the Gadani beach resulted in the arrest of the ship.

Shipbreaking Platform warned that this is not the first time cash buyers have sought to circumvent environmental protection laws by providing fake contracts of repair or further operational use.

Recently the Norwegian owned CITY OF TOKYO was said to have been allowed to leave the port of Antwerp under the pretence of repair work in Dubai – instead it sailed directly to the infamous beaching yards in Bangladesh.

The FPSO NORTH SEA PRODUCER was also said to have been illegally exported from the UK to Bangladesh under the pretence of further operational use in Nigeria. Cash buyer GMS reportedly used grey- and black listed Paris MoU flags and established anonymous post box companies in both cases.

“The cash buyers of TIDE CARRIER will not only have to pay back the Norwegian authorities for the rescue operation, but will also have to answer for the fake repair documents which were used to let it sail in the first place,” said Jenssen.

Norwegian owner Eide will have to be held responsible for having sold to a cash buyer as this clearly indicates their complicity in the attempt to illegally export the ship and the potentially toxic excess sludges and fuels found on board,” she concluded.

Source: waste management world. 06 April 2017

Norwegian authorities play hardball

Norway, which as reported last year in ‘Maritime Journal’ has taken an assertive stance in outlawing dangerous South Asian shipbreaking practices, has further signalled its intent by arresting a vessel in one of its ports, the NGO Shipbreaking Platform has reported.

Having been informed by the Platform and its member organisation Bellona that the Tide Carrier (now named Harrier, aka Eide Carrier) had been sold for illegal, dirty and dangerous scrapping in a South Asian beaching facility, the Norwegian environmental authorities arrested the ship on Tuesday 5 April.

The vessel is not allowed to leave Norway unless it is to sail to a ship recycling destination in line with international and European hazardous waste laws. According to the Norwegian Environment Agency, it is the first arrest of a vessel in Norway for the illegal export of hazardous waste.

The Platform had been informed already during the summer of 2015 that the ship was sold for scrap. Having been laid up for many years on the Norwegian west coast the Platform immediately contacted the Norwegian owners Eide Group to make them aware of the laws governing end-of-life ships and that exporting the vessel to a South Asian beaching yard would be in breach of the European Waste Shipment Regulation and the UN Basel Convention. Eide Group denied then that the vessel would be scrapped.

FLAGS OF CONVENIENCE
On 22 February 2017 the vessel attempted to leave Norway under a new name, flag and registered owner. Now called Tide Carrier, the ship had swapped its flag to that of Comoros and was registered under an anonymous St. Kitts and Nevis based post-box company, Julia Shipping - all solid indications that a cash buyer, a scrap dealer specialised in the trading of end-of-life ships to the South Asian beaching yards, was involved.

The Tide Carrier however ran into difficulties as the engine stopped working outside the Norwegian coast of Jaeren. The coastguards were forced to trigger a salvage operation, complicated by way of the weather conditions, to avoid the risk of oil spill and grounding close to one of the most famous beaches in Norway. The rescue operation included the emergency evacuation of 5 crew members - one of whom suffered from a broken shoulder – and the deployment of two tugs to bring the ship to safety.

PAPER TRAIL
Norwegian authorities have since then been trying to trace the owner and insurer of the vessel, given that someone should be held accountable for the costs of the rescue operation incurred by the Norwegian state. While the authorities investigated the ownership and condition of the vessel, it remained docked in Gismarvik, Norway.

“We immediately informed Norwegian authorities that the ship was most likely sold for scrapping in South Asia and also that there were suspicions that the ship had been used to store hazardous sludge,” says Ingvild Jenssen, Director at the NGO Shipbreaking Platform.

On Monday 4 April the Environment Agency and the Police found evidence that the vessel was under a ‘break up voyage’ insurance from Norway to Gadani, Pakistan. They also found unidentified and excessive amounts of sludge and fuel oils. The previous week, while the vessel was still in the dock, the Tide Carrier changed its name to Harrier and changed from Comoros to another popular end-of-life flag: Palau. Consequently, it became clear that the repair contract from Oman which had been provided to the Norwegian authorities as a way to escape checks for the illegal export of the vessel was false. Revelations of the attempt of the ship’s illegal export and subsequent breaking on the Gadani beach resulted in the arrest of the ship.

This is not the first time cash buyers seek to circumvent environmental protection laws by providing fake contracts of repair or further operational use. Recently the Norwegian owned City of Tokyo was allowed to leave the port of Antwerp under the pretence of repair work in Dubai – instead it sailed directly to the infamous beaching yards in Bangladesh. The FPSO North Sea Producer was also illegally exported from the UK to Bangladesh under the pretence of further operational use in Nigeria. Cash buyer GMS used grey- and black listed Paris MoU flags and established anonymous post box companies in both cases.

“The cash buyers of Tide Carrier will not only have to pay back the Norwegian authorities for the rescue operation, but will also have to answer for the fake repair documents which were used to let it sail in the first place. Norwegian owner Eide will have to be held responsible for having sold to a cash buyer as this clearly indicates their complicity in the attempt to illegally export the ship and the potentially toxic excess sludges and fuels found on board,” said Ingvild Jenssen. 


06 April 2017

PRESS RELEASE – CONTROVERSIAL TIDE CARRIER UNDER ARREST IN NORWAY

Attempt to illegally export the ship to Pakistan revealed


Brussels/Oslo, 6 April 2017 – After having been informed by the NGO Shipbreaking Platform and its member organisation Bellona that the TIDE CARRIER (now named HARRIER, aka EIDE CARRIER) had been sold for illegal, dirty and dangerous scrapping to a South Asian beaching facility, the Norwegian environmental authorities arrested the ship on Tuesday 5 April [1]. The vessel is not allowed to leave Norway unless it is to sail to a ship recycling destination in line with international and European hazardous waste laws. According to the Norwegian Environment Agency, it is the first arrest of a vessel in Norway for the illegal export of hazardous waste.

The Platform had been informed already during the summer of 2015 that the ship was sold for scrap. Having been laid up for many years on the Norwegian west coast the Platform immediately contacted the Norwegian owners Eide Group to make them aware of the laws governing end-of-life ships and that exporting the vessel to a South Asian beaching yard would be in breach of the European Waste Shipment Regulation and the UN Basel Convention. Eide Group denied then that the vessel would be scrapped.
On 22 February 2017 the vessel attempted to leave Norway under a new name, flag and registered owner. Now called TIDE CARRIER, the ship had swapped its flag to that of Comoros and was registered under an anonymous St. Kitts and Nevis based post-box company, Julia Shipping – all solid indications that a cash buyer, a scrap dealer specialised in the trading of end-of-life ships to the South Asian beaching yards, was involved.

The TIDE CARRIER however ran into difficulties as the engine stopped working outside the Norwegian coast of Jaeren. The coastguards were forced to trigger a salvage operation, complicated by way of the weather conditions, to avoid the risk of oil spill and grounding close to one of the most renowned beaches in Norway. The rescue operation included the emergency evacuation of 5 crew members – one of which suffered from a broken shoulder – and the deployment of two tugboats to bring the ship to safety.

Norwegian authorities have since then been trying to trace the owner and insurer of the vessel, given that someone should be held accountable for the costs of the rescue operation incurred by the Norwegian state. While the authorities investigated the ownership and condition of the vessel, it remained docked in Gismarvik, Norway.

“We immediately informed Norwegian authorities that the ship was most likely sold for scrapping in South Asia and also that there were suspicions that the ship had been used to store hazardous sludge,” says Ingvild Jenssen, Director at the NGO Shipbreaking Platform.

On Monday 4 April the Environment Agency and the Police found evidence that the vessel was under a “break up voyage” insurance from Norway to Gadani, Pakistan. They also found unidentified and excessive amounts of sludge and fuel oils. The previous week, while the vessel was still in the dock, the TIDE CARRIER changed name to HARRIER and changed from Comoros to another popular end-of-life flag: Palau. Consequently, it became clear that the repair contract from Oman which had been provided to the Norwegian authorities as a way to escape checks for the illegal export of the vessel was false. Revelations of the attempt of the ship’s illegal export and subsequent breaking on the Gadani beach resulted in the arrest of the ship.

This is not the first time cash buyers seek to circumvent environmental protection laws by providing fake contracts of repair or further operational use. Recently the Norwegian owned CITY OF TOKYO was allowed to leave the port of Antwerp under the pretense of repair work in Dubai – instead it sailed directly to the infamous beaching yards in Bangladesh. The FPSO NORTH SEA PRODUCER was also illegally exported from the UK to Bangladesh under the pretense of further operational use in Nigeria [2]. Cash buyer GMS used grey- and black listed Paris MoU flags and established anonymous post box companies in both cases.

“The cash buyers of TIDE CARRIER will not only have to pay back the Norwegian authorities for the rescue operation, but will also have to answer for the fake repair documents which were used to let it sail in the first place. Norwegian owner Eide will have to be held responsible for having sold to a cash buyer as this clearly indicates their complicity in the attempt to illegally export the ship and the potentially toxic excess sludges and fuels found on board,” says Ingvild Jenssen.

Source: ship breaking platform. 06 April 20